Emilia-Romagna

“Discover Wines with a Story” Event at Carluccio’s London

Did you know that Antonio Carluccio started out as a wine merchant before starting his much-loved Carluccio’s restaurants? Now I know, it doesn’t surprise me. One of the best value meals on the high street, I’ve spent many times after tastings having a plate of pasta and a glass of quality wine, because wines, such as Planeta or Caruso & Minini, are reliably delicious and very well priced. Always promoting the regions of Italian food and wines, with 80-plus restaurants, they have found that difficult balance between price and quality.

To celebrate the launch of Carluccio’s Wine Explorers collection, we tasted four wines with four typical Carluccio’s courses, as well as starting with an excellent Trentino DOC sparkling from Ferrari made in the Champagne style.

Perhaps these wines are less well known on the UK high street, but what struck me is how “alternative varieties” are now breaking through. Carluccio’s has played a big role in introducing Italian food and wine to the UK, and with these Italian wines, this is another exciting step in the right direction for high street eating.

Menu

Lambrusco Vecchia Modena, Cleto Chiarli, Emilia Romagna with a Grandioso charcuterie board (Gran Sasso, salami centricina Abruzzese, soppressa al finocchio, prodciutoo cotto, salami Aquila, chicken liver pâté bruschetta, caponata bruschetta, Parmigiano Reggiano, poponcini peppers with pesto, artichokes, mint and garlic marinated green beans, balsamic onions, mixed Italian olives and caper berries.

Pecorino, Villa dei Fiori, Abruzzo with Beetroot and Goat’s Cheese Saled

La Segreta, Planeta, Sicily with Penne Giardiniera (Giant Pugliese penne with courgette, chilli and garlic, served with fried spinach balls and cheese).

Frappato, Caruso & Minini, Sicily with Lamb alla Griglia (Marinated tender lamb chops chargrilled and drizzled with mint pesto. Served with couscous salad and mixed leaves).

Wine Explorers Offer

Carluccio’s have very kindly offered Vinissima readers a £10 voucher to discover their Wine Explorer range for yourself. Until 1 October, download this voucher and when you eat at Carluccio’s you can try one of these wines for the special price of just £10.*

*See terms and conditions of voucher.

 

Notes from Parma: What is quality Lambrusco?

Parma is VIOLETS. Aged hams, dark chocolate, profumo, the fizz of Lambrusco.

Violets became popular under Maria-Luiga, the Duchess of Parma and second wife of Napoleon, whose presence can be felt everywhere walking along the prosciutto-coloured streets.

The smell of violet has three distinct parts: candy-sweet, violet flower and violet leaf. In my opinion, this can be seen as the spectrum of quality of Lambrusco. The worst being confectionary and the best redolent of violet leaf. A good, refreshing Lambrusco has a violet leaf dryness with a violet fizz that immediately dissipates into an ecstasy of violet perfume.

After my last post, I had some rather strong reactions to my assertion there could even be a possibility of quality Lambrusco. Think of it this way. Rose was also once considered a sweet and cheap drink. Look at it today. Over the past 10 years it has become one of the most versatile and food-friendly wines on the menu.

What do you think? Can you recommend anything good? Or is Lambrusco a hopeless case?

 

Notes from Parma: My response to “What Food, What Wine” Competition’s Zero Score for Italy

Emilia-Romagna is strange. The train departure board could be a poster announcing a stadium tour of gastronomic rockstars – Parma, Bologna, Modena – and yet… as far as wine goes, the region is mostly known for its sweet fizzy Lambrusco.

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